Seabay Handmade Noodle Restaurant, Burwood: Chopped noodle with pork

Rating: 4 out of 5

Seabay Handmade Noodle Restaurant
181D Burwood Road, Burwood 2134

chopped handmade noodle

Hand pulled noodles, or la mian, is a well known Chinese speciality which is a fascinating process to watch.  The result is usually long strands of beautifully springy noodle.  However, on a visit to Seabay Handmade Noodle Restaurant in the Inner West suburb of Burwood, I discovered a new way to have these delicious noodles – chopped!  The thicker rope of yellow noodle dough is chopped into little chunks so they look like a pile of corn kernels.  No longer will first daters fumble with their chopsticks in a lame attempt to look like they’re worldly, yet try in vain to prevent embarrassing stains in their lap.  Here is a noodle that you can eat with a spoon!

The chopped noodle was firm due to its thickness, but still had a nice chewy and bouncy texture.  It was served with a loads of pork mince, chopped tomato, red capsicum, Chinese cabbage and chives, all in similar size pieces so that you can get a good mix of everything in each spoonful.  Bringing it all together was a delicious soy, garlic sauce with a hint of vinegary sourness contrast.

A generous serving will only set you back a mere $11.80, which equates to decent value at this popular Burwood noodle joint.  If you haven’t tried chopped noodle before, this dish is a surefire bet to convert you to the convenience and ease of spoon noodle eating!

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Seabay Handmade Noodle Restaurant, Burwood: Beef noodle soup

Rating: 4 out of 5

Seabay Handmade Noodle Restaurant
181D Burwood Road, Burwood 2134

beef noodle soup handmade noodles

Seabay Handmade Noodle Restaurant has a bit of a rock star reputation according to the locals in the know. Despite the nondescript exterior, which includes a large photographic menu board that virtually covers their front window, this place is busy day and night. What the locals come here for is the beautiful hand made noodle, la mian, and the cumin lamb that comes on long metal skewers (in my opinion though, the best cumin lamb skewers in Sydney can be found at Lamb & Cumin at Hurstville station).

One of my friends, who is a Burwood local, could not rave about this place highly enough, and specifically the beef noodle soup. As I walked into the restaurant during their busy dinner service, I could see a few diners hunched over their steaming bowls of beef noodle soup – clearly a favourite! It was a no-brainer to go with their specialty.

When my very large bowl of beef noodle soup arrived, I was struck at first by the beautiful fragrant aroma of the fresh coriander and spring onions, which were sprinkled liberally on the top. It almost reminded me of a pho, the Vietnamese beef noodle soup. The almost paper thin slices of beef were floating tantalisingly on the surface, and the snow white hand pulled noodles were hiding just below.

The first thing I did was the pick up a spoon and taste the beautiful clear broth, and it had a clean beef flavour with a hint of sweetness, and my whole mouth and nose filled with the fragrance of the fresh herbs. The noodles had the perfect level of firmness and chewiness, which despite the overly generous portion, were so delicious that I just had to fish out every last noodle from the bottom of the bowl!  A simple meal, but oh so satisfying.

This was pretty much a perfect bowl of noodle soup, save for beef slices, which were a tad on the dry side. If they could have served the sliced beef raw, this would have been my idea of heaven in a bowl. And at a mere $9.80 for a massive serving, you could not get better value anywhere else in Sydney.

beef noodle soup handmade noodles

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Canton Noodle House, Burwood: Beef chow ho fun

Rating: 3 out of 5

Canton Noodle House
45 Burwood Road, Burwood 2134

beef ho fun

Ho fun, or the thick, flat rice noodles, is probably my favourite type of noodle in the world.  Soft and silky, and readily absorbing the flavours of whatever you add, it’s delicious even when served simply with a little bit of soy sauce and chilli oil.  Growing up, my dad often made beef chow ho fun, served with marinated strips of beef, so it’s certainly a nostalgic dish for me.

This restaurant is in the suburb of Burwood, which has a healthy Chinese population, and as a result, a multitude of Chinese restaurant choices.  The Canton Noodle House is popular during both lunch and dinner services, serving with military efficiency a big variety of noodle dishes as well as the favourites like sweet and sour pork or salt and pepper squid.

The beef chow ho fun was a generous size, as is the case with pretty much every dish here, and had a pleasing glossy sheen without being too oily.  The noodles were soft and elastic, just as they should be, and this was contrasted with the crunchiness of fresh bean sprouts and subtle hint of aromatic onion from the stir-fried chives.  There was plenty of tender grilled beef to keep meat fans happy, although for a noodle fan like myself, I would have preferred a higher ratio of noodles to meat.  One slightly annoying thing was the varying sizes of beef, with some pieces small and dainty, but others so big that you couldn’t fit a whole piece in your mouth with looking gluttonous, let alone having some noodle with your mouthful of meat.

The dish was polished off without too many complaints, and considering the portion size, a good value proposition when washed down with free hot tea!

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Canton Noodle House, Burwood: Combination chow mein

Rating: 3 out of 5

Canton Noodle House
45 Burwood Road, Burwood 2134

combination chow mein

Something has to be said about a place that is unfussy to look at, with wipe down tables, fluorescent lighting, and a menu handwritten on coloured paper stuck to the wall, but is always filled with eager Chinese diners.

This restaurant is smack in the middle of Burwood, and is a favourite at lunch time and also in the evening.  We dined here on a Monday night, which would normally be a night that restaurant owners have off, but this place is still busy.  We are seated quickly and efficiently, with a pot of hot Chinese tea reaching our table before our bums even hit our seats.

The combination chow mein arrived after only a short wait, and we found a generous mix of seafood, vegetables, tender chicken and beef, and BBQ pork in a saucy gravy, poured over a thick nest of crispy thin egg noodles. One of the best things about chow mein is having a mix of textures, with crunchy noodles as well as soft noodles after the gravy has deliciously soaked in.

This dish was generously proportioned, and the meat was tender and juicy.  There was also a fairly even ratio of meat and vegetables to noodle, meaning you’re not left with lonely noodles or meat towards the end of the meal.  However, the gravy was a little on the salty side, and was a bit too gelatinous, suggesting that the chef was a bit overeager with the corn starch.

Overall, the combination chow mein here is great value at $10.70 for a big serving without the frills but delivers it with no fuss.

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