Thuy Huong, Marrickville: Bun thit nuong cha gio

Rating: 3 out of 5

Thuy Huong
304 Illawarra Road, Marrickville 2204

thuy huong bun thit nuong cha gioMarrickville has been a melting pot of immigrant cultures for a long time, but is best known now for the plethora of Vietnamese restaurants and Asian grocery stores.  It’s a vibrant little community, with Sunday markets, cafes, restaurants, and an annual Marrickville Festival.

Along the busy Illawarra Road strip is the popular Thuy Huong restaurant.  It is simply decorated with tiled floors and wooden tables, and is a modest, family-run restaurant.  However simple it may look, it is always filled with diners – couples, families, and friends sitting with tables overflowing with large, steaming bowls of pho.

The bun thit nuong cha gio is a good choice if you can’t decide between the pork or the spring rolls for your rice noodles – why not have both!  It’s a huge portion, and the bowl is brimming with BBQ lemongrass pork, three crisp spring rolls, and loads of fresh salad topping the soft, rice vermicelli noodles.  Pouring over the nuoc cham dressing, I tuck into the refreshing mix of cold noodle and salad contrasting with the hot pork and spring rolls.  The charred and caramelised pork is juicy, and the spring rolls are filled with pork mince, cabbage, black fungus, and carrot, although aren’t as porky as I’d like.

I always love a good bun.  This one ticks the boxes, with a delicious mix of textures and flavours – crunchy fresh cucumber, bean sprouts and carrot having a party in your mouth with soft noodle, meaty pork, and sweet, salty and sour dressing. If you’re in the area, Thuy Huong is definitely a good choice for a satisfying Vietnamese feed.

Thuy Huong Coffee Lounge on Urbanspoon

Ichi-ban Boshi, Sydney: Wonton-men

Rating: 4 out of 5

Ichi-ban Boshi
Level 2, The Galeries, 500 George Street, Sydney 2000

ichi ban boshi wonton men ramen

If a ramen could be judged by the size of the queue, Ichi-ban Boshi undoubtedly has a good thing going.  On each of my visits, there has been a throng of hungry diners waiting for a table.  Thankfully, the queue seems to move fairly quickly, especially if you’re willing to share a table with other ramen fans.

It’s a slightly odd experience coming to Ichi-ban Boshi for dinner.  The restaurant is situated right at the top of the Galeries, next to Kinokuniya bookshop.  In the evening, when the centre is closed, dark and quiet, it’s as though the restaurant is an oasis of light, food, and chatter.  Claiming a table is a matter of jotting down how many diners are in your group on the grid provided, specify whether you are happy to share (presumably this increases your chances of getting a table sooner), then take a number and wait.

On this visit, I decided to try the wonton ramen ($13).  Wontons are more familiar in Chinese cuisine, so this dish is a clever fusion of Chinese and Japanese styles.  The thin, straight noodles are served in a light, shio soup, along with choy sum, seaweed, and a dollop of miso paste.

The noodles were spot on in their springiness and bite, but the absolute highlight were the triangular-shaped wontons.  Each wonton was generously proportioned, with a huge hit of juicy prawns in each one.  However, if seafood isn’t your thing (gotta say though, your loss!) there is a huge range of different ramen dishes to appeal to your taste buds.

Ichi-ban Boshi on Urbanspoon